nofluxus:

NO FLUXUS / B
Thierry Tillier
in progress

nofluxus:

NO FLUXUS / B

Thierry Tillier

in progress

nofluxus:

NO FLUXUS / B
Anna Banana 
in progress

nofluxus:

NO FLUXUS / B

Anna Banana 

in progress

nofluxus:

NO FLUXUS / B

Anna Banana / Thierry Tillier

in progress

nofluxus:

NO FLUXUS / B

Anna Banana / Thierry Tillier

in progress

nofluxus:

NO FLUXUS / A

nofluxus:

NO FLUXUS / A

nofluxus:

Imago : Thierry Tillier

nofluxus:

NO FLUXUS / A

nofluxus:

NO FLUXUS / A

momalibrary:

Hey kids, Ever wonder how people exchanged images before the internet? Let’s talk about mail art. It was a kind of art movement in which participants informally circulated works through the postal service. These international networks particularly thrived in the 1970s and 1980s. The MoMA website post has just launched a feature on the Mexico-based mail art project Poema Colectivo: Revolución. Follow the link to check out the large image archive of respondents to the Poema Colectivo project. As the researchers Mauricio Marcin and Zanna Gilbert describe: 

“The artists’ group Colectivo 3 initiated the Poema Colectivo in Mexico City in 1981 and drew upon the international mail art network, some of whose members had been exchanging artworks and unconventional ideas about art through the mail for more than a decade. The invited artists received sheets of paper with blank squares in the center, where they were invited to mark their responses to the theme of revolution. The results, mailed back to Colectivo 3 from forty-five countries, provide insight into a broad array of artistic and political views and strategies. One of the main principles of this artist-to-artist interaction was that all works submitted to the project were accepted, as was the case for all mail art projects. By refusing to employ selection criteria, mail artists constructed a system in which formalist notions of quality and curatorial intervention were of little importance.” 

 —ds

momalibrary:

Hey kids, Ever wonder how people exchanged images before the internet? Let’s talk about mail art. It was a kind of art movement in which participants informally circulated works through the postal service. These international networks particularly thrived in the 1970s and 1980s. The MoMA website post has just launched a feature on the Mexico-based mail art project Poema Colectivo: Revolución. Follow the link to check out the large image archive of respondents to the Poema Colectivo project. As the researchers Mauricio Marcin and Zanna Gilbert describe: 

The artists’ group Colectivo 3 initiated the Poema Colectivo in Mexico City in 1981 and drew upon the international mail art network, some of whose members had been exchanging artworks and unconventional ideas about art through the mail for more than a decade. The invited artists received sheets of paper with blank squares in the center, where they were invited to mark their responses to the theme of revolution. The results, mailed back to Colectivo 3 from forty-five countries, provide insight into a broad array of artistic and political views and strategies. One of the main principles of this artist-to-artist interaction was that all works submitted to the project were accepted, as was the case for all mail art projects. By refusing to employ selection criteria, mail artists constructed a system in which formalist notions of quality and curatorial intervention were of little importance.” 

 —ds

momalibrary:

We have a new show: Analog Network: Mail Art, 1960–1999. Come see it in the Cullman Building Mezzanine through January 5.Mail art—broadly defined as artists’ postal communication—emerged in the early 1960s from Fluxus, Nouveau Réalisme, and Conceptual art practices and expanded into a decentralized, global network. This exhibition traces the growth of correspondence networks, shows politically oriented works, documents discourse about the practice, and concludes with mail artists’ adaptation to the Internet.
We’ll be having a related event on Friday, November 14, focusing on mail artist Guglielmo Achille Cavellini. Details to come. -jt
Envelope from the Franklin Furnace Collection, MoMA Library.

momalibrary:

We have a new show: Analog Network: Mail Art, 1960–1999. Come see it in the Cullman Building Mezzanine through January 5.

Mail art—broadly defined as artists’ postal communication—emerged in the early 1960s from Fluxus, Nouveau Réalisme, and Conceptual art practices and expanded into a decentralized, global network. This exhibition traces the growth of correspondence networks, shows politically oriented works, documents discourse about the practice, and concludes with mail artists’ adaptation to the Internet.

We’ll be having a related event on Friday, November 14, focusing on mail artist Guglielmo Achille Cavellini. Details to come. -jt

Envelope from the Franklin Furnace Collection, MoMA Library.

nofluxus:

Imago : Thierry Tillier

nofluxus:

NO FLUXUS / A
Thierry Tillier 2014

nofluxus:

NO FLUXUS / A

Thierry Tillier 2014

nofluxus:

Imago : Thierry Tillier